Social Reward

Neural activation during anticipation of opposite-sex and same-sex faces in heterosexual men and women

Abstract Psychobiological accounts of face processing predict that greater salience is attributed to faces matching a viewer’s sexual preference than to faces that do not. However, behaviorally, this effect could only be demonstrated in tasks assessing reward ‘wanting’ (e.g. work-per-view-tasks) but not in tasks assessing ‘liking’ (e.g. facial attractiveness ratings), and has been found to …

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Oxytocin influences processing of socially relevant cues in the ventral tegmental area of the human brain

Abstract Background: Evidence accumulates that the neuropeptide oxytocin plays an important role in mediating social interaction among humans and that a dysfunction in oxytocin-modulated brain mechanisms might lie at the core of disturbed social behavior in neuropsychiatric disease. Explanatory models suggest that oxytocin guides social approach and avoidance by modulating the perceived salience of socially meaningful …

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Dissociation of neural networks for anticipation and consumption of monetary and social rewards

Abstract Human behaviour is generally guided by the anticipation of potential outcomes that are considered to be rewarding. Reward processing can thus be dissected into a phase of reward anticipation and a phase of reward consumption. A number of brain structures have been suggested to be involved in reward processing. However, it is unclear whether …

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Anticipation of monetary and social reward differently activates mesolimbic brain structures in men and women

Abstract Motivation for goal-directed behaviour largely depends on the expected value of the anticipated reward. The aim of the present study was to examine how different levels of reward value are coded in the brain for two common forms of human reward: money and social approval. To account for gender differences 16 male and 16 …

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