Scientific Reports

Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep increases next-day negative affect and amygdala responses to social exclusion

Abstract Healthy sleep, positive general affect, and the ability to regulate emotional experiences are fundamental for well-being. In contrast, various mental disorders are associated with altered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, negative affect, and diminished emotion regulation abilities. However, the neural processes mediating the relationship between these different phenomena are still not fully understood. In …

Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep increases next-day negative affect and amygdala responses to social exclusion Read More »

Negativity-bias in forming beliefs about own abilities

Abstract During everyday interactions people constantly receive feedback on their behavior, which shapes their beliefs about themselves. While classic studies in the field of social learning suggest that people have a tendency to learn better from good news (positivity bias) when they perceive little opportunities to immediately improve their own performance, we show updating is …

Negativity-bias in forming beliefs about own abilities Read More »

Neural mechanisms of affective matching across faces and scenes

Abstract The emotional matching paradigm, introduced by Hariri and colleagues in 2000, is a widely used neuroimaging experiment that reliably activates the amygdala. In the classic version of the experiment faces with negative emotional expression and scenes depicting distressing events are compared with geometric shapes instead of neutral stimuli of the same category (i.e. faces …

Neural mechanisms of affective matching across faces and scenes Read More »

Handedness is related to neural mechanisms underlying hemispheric lateralization of face processing

Abstract While the right-hemispheric lateralization of the face perception network is well established, recent evidence suggests that handedness affects the cerebral lateralization of face processing at the hierarchical level of the fusiform face area (FFA). However, the neural mechanisms underlying differential hemispheric lateralization of face perception in right- and left-handers are largely unknown. Using dynamic …

Handedness is related to neural mechanisms underlying hemispheric lateralization of face processing Read More »

Scroll to Top