Sören Krach

New clinical trial published! Randomized clinical trial shows no substantial modulation of empathy-related neural activation by intranasal oxytocin in autism

Yeah, finally – after several rounds of submissions and rejections and a year-long lasting and exhausting review process at Scientific Reports… – we are now happy to announce that our clinical trial “Randomized clinical trial shows no substantial modulation of empathy-related neural activation by intranasal oxytocin in autism.” is published. Main thanks go to Annalina V. Mayer who …

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The influence of anger on empathy and theory of mind

Social cognition allows humans to understand and predict other people’s behavior by inferring or sharing their emotions, intentions and beliefs. Few studies have investigated the impact of one’s own emotional state on understanding others. Here, we tested the effect of being in an angry state on empathy and theory of mind (ToM). In a between-groups …

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Best Paper Award for Laura Müller-Pinzler at the NeuroPsychoEconomics conference

Great news! Laura Müller-Pinzler has received the 2021 Best Paper Award at the NeuroPsychoEconomics conference in Amsterdam for the presentation of her latest project in the symposium “Social Neuroeconomics” (Chair: Jan Engelmann).    Abstract Biases in self-related belief formation and their association with self-conscious affect During everyday interactions people constantly receive feedback on their behavior, …

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New review paper on “Neuroscience of social feelings” published!

As part of the international Neuroqualia taskforce “Social” we, as team led by Paul J. Eslinger, have successfully published our review on the “Neuroscience of social feelings”. The paper summarizes recent efforts in the field of social cognitive and affective neuroscience on concepts, methods and challenges in the field of social feelings research.  Check out the publication …

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The neuroscience of social feelings: mechanisms of adaptive social functioning

Abstract Social feelings have conceptual and empirical connections with affect and emotion. In this review, we discuss how they relate to cognition, emotion, behavior and well-being. We examne the functional neuroanatomy and neurobiology of social feelings and their role in adaptive social functioning. Existing neuroscience literature is reviewed to identify concepts, methods and challenges that …

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No support for oxytocin modulation of reward-related brain function in autism: evidence from a randomized controlled trial

Abstract Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by difficulties in social communication and interaction, which have been related to atypical neural processing of rewards, especially in the social domain. Since intranasal oxytocin has been shown to modulate activation of the brain’s reward circuit, oxytocin could be a useful tool to ameliorate the processing of social …

No support for oxytocin modulation of reward-related brain function in autism: evidence from a randomized controlled trial Read More »

Association of stress-related limbic activity and baseline interleukin-6 plasma levels in healthy adults

Abstract Several studies suggest a link between acute changes in inflammatory parameters due to an endotoxin or (psychological) stressor and the brain’s stress response. The extent to which basal circulating levels of inflammatory markers are associated with the brain’s stress response has been hardly investigated so far. In the present study, plasma levels of the …

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