Sören Krach

Empathie, Intuition und die Übertragung von Gefühlen

Podcast-Diskussion mit Alexander Nusselt und Daniel Fürg von 48forward.com über Social Neuroscience, soziale Emotionen und Intuition   Unsere Gefühle sind Teil dessen, was uns zu Menschen macht. Pandemie und Beschränkungen dauern nun schon über ein Jahr und wir haben den Eindruck, dass immer mehr Menschen stark von ihren Emotionen geleitet werden. Ein Blick in die …

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Reduced frontal cortical tracking of conflict between selfish versus prosocial motives in Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Abstract Abstract Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) entails severe impariments in interpersonal functioning that are likely driven by selfish and exploitative behavior. Here, we investigate the underlying motivational and neural mechanisms of prosocial decision-making by experimentally manipulating motivational conflict between selfish and prosocial incentives. One group of patients diagnosed with NPD and a group of healthy …

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New preprint! Reduced frontal cortical tracking of conflict between selfish versus prosocial motives in Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Reduced Frontal Cortical Tracking of Conflict between Selfish versus Prosocial Motives in Narcissistic Personality Disorder David S Stolz, Aline Vater, Björn H Schott, Stefan Roepke, Frieder M Paulus, Sören Krach Abstract Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) entails severe impariments in interpersonal functioning that are likely driven by selfish and exploitative behavior. Here, we investigate the underlying …

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Meta-analysis of fMRI studies using the Social Incentive Delay (SID) task accepted at Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews!

Together with colleagues from King’s College London, University of Oxford, Virginia Tech, Temple University, University Medical Center Groningen and the University of Amsterdam Lena Rademacher published a new meta-analysis of functional MRI studies using the social incentive delay (SID) paradigm (see Spreckelmeyer et al., 2009; Rademacher et al., 2010).    Check out the publication here: …

Meta-analysis of fMRI studies using the Social Incentive Delay (SID) task accepted at Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews! Read More »

Mapping social reward and punishment processing in the human brain: A voxel-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging findings using the Social Incentive Delay task

Abstract Social incentives (rewards or punishments) motivate human learning and behaviour, and alterations in the brain circuits involved in the processing social incentives have been linked with several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, questions still remain about the exact neural substrates implicated in social incentive processing. Here, we conducted four Anisotropic Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping voxel-based …

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Self-beneficial belief updating as a coping mechanism for stress-induced negative affect

Abstract Being confronted with social-evaluative stress elicits a physiological and a psychological stress response. This calls for regulatory processes to manage negative affect and maintain self-related optimistic beliefs. The aim of the current study was to investigate the affect-regulating potential of self-related belief updating after exposure to social-evaluative stress, in comparison to non-social physical stress …

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Successful defense by Dr. med. Banafsche Sayyad!

After several years, next to working as a physician at the Klinikum Neukölln (Berlin) in the field of neurology, Banafsche Sayyad has finally finished her MD in our lab! Congratulations!  In her thesis, Banafsche examined how “sex/gender” is operationalised in functional MRI research and what consequences and implications such operationalisations carry. Therefore Banafsche analysed 34 …

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Painful laughter – Media and politics in the age of cringe

Painful laughter – Wieland Schwanebeck (TU Dresden), with support from the Volkswagen Stiftung, organized this inspiring symposium on the role of awkwardness and cringe comedy in media and politics at the Schloss Herrenhausen in Hannover. Talks spanned from early British comedy to analyses and discussions of up-to-date cringe comedy (e.g. live interview with Robert B. Weide, …

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The effect of REM sleep suppression on next-morning brain function during social exclusion – new publication in Scientific Reports

With strong effort and methodological expertise from David S. Stolz and Robert Glosemeyer, but also many other colleagues, we have finally managed to publish our sleep study data dating back to our time at Marburg University (2010-2015). Using polysomnography and next-morning fMRI we show that selective suppression of REM sleep impacts amygdala activity and connectivity during a classic social …

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Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep increases next-day negative affect and amygdala responses to social exclusion

Abstract Healthy sleep, positive general affect, and the ability to regulate emotional experiences are fundamental for well-being. In contrast, various mental disorders are associated with altered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, negative affect, and diminished emotion regulation abilities. However, the neural processes mediating the relationship between these different phenomena are still not fully understood. In …

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